Bucks Fungus Group
BFG Logo

Members’ Finds, 2021 July - Dec

Following the success and popularity of our experimental Members' Finds Autumn 2020 project, we have now set up this new page for 2021 to which members are again invited to contribute. We are starting afresh with a new species list, so please email Penny photos of anything you find - even of species previously on last autumn's list. Try to illustrate all aspects of the fruit body, also remember not to reduce the photo size and to include the date, site, substrate, habitat plus any other useful features such a size, smell, etc. All extra clues are vital when identifying solely from photos. Ideally, try to collect at least one specimen and retain in a pot until you’ve heard back from Penny in case it might be needed for further investigation - records of rarities are of no use without voucher material as we discovered to our cost in several instances during our autumn project.

As Covid 19 Tier 4 restrictions (January 2021) require only essential travel in our area, we will all now be limited to our local patches. Therefore as Penny and Derek both live outside the county they will not now be able to contribute until the restrictions are eased. So it will be up to members to take on the challenge and keep the records coming in!

HAPPY HUNTING!

As before, please bear in mind that only collections having the scope symbol microscope icon have been fully examined in order to make a determination. No guarantee can therefore be given on the vast majority of identifications though all photos are checked and selected by Penny to the best of her ability. Basic accompanying notes are also Penny's but when of a species already covered in Members' Finds Autumn 2020 a reference to the appropriate date will be given rather than duplicating the identification tips here.

Click on thumbnail to see full size
For the complete and regularly updated list of entries click Latin or English

Contributors / Photographers: Catterson, John and Lesley; Cullington, Penny; Dodsworth, Joanna; Douglas, Greg; Ewan, Jackie; Ferguson, Gill; Fletcher, Neil; Goby, Paul; Knight, Tony; Launder, Jesper; Marshall, Tony; Robinson, Kerry; Ness, Russell; Simpson, Bob; Townsend, Phil; Webb, Barry; Williams, Claire.

Click on thumbnail to see full size.

Click here to see stunning images of Slime Moulds by Barry Webb

Entries with a green background indicate rare sightings 23

Entries with a yellow background indicate species new to Britain

Image Details

July 28th 2021

Russula cyanoxantha by Jesper Lauder July 28th Russula cyanoxantha (Charcoal Burner)

In a roadside verge in Chalfont St. Peter Jesper Launder spotted this nice specimen of one of our commonest Brittlegills. The species is happy under any deciduous trees though is easy to confuse with several others having caps with a mix of green, blue, violet and pink shades. It is unclear where its traditional common name originated but one way to separate it from others is with a ferrous sulphate crystal: the stem when rubbed has a slow almost negative reaction, turning not rusty salmon as in many species but if anything very pale greenish grey.
Ganoderma resinaceum  by Jesper Lauder July 28th Ganoderma resinaceum (a bracket with no common name)

On a large Beech in Chalfont St. Giles Jesper Launder spotted this quite unusual bracket, one closely related to the Southern Bracket and for some known as Lacquered Bracket (though that name is officially alotted to the very similar G. lucidum). This is an immature specimen and at this stage the red brown, crusty almost varnished upper surface is very different from the common Southern and Artists's Brackets which are both rough and bumpy, though all Ganoderma species have white pores beneath but chocolate brown spores.
Pseudoinonotus dryadeus by Jesper Lauder July 28th Pseudoinonotus dryadeus (previously in Inonotus) (Oak Bracket)

At the base of a mature Oak in Chalfont St. Peter Jesper Launder spotted this large and impressive bracket displaying its typical droplets which form when the fungus is actively growing and moist. The pores, not seen here, are greyish white as are the spores, and we have several sites where we record it regularly on its host tree, Oak.
Inosperma maculatum  by Jesper Lauder Inosperma maculatum  by Jesper Lauder July 28th Inosperma maculatum (previously Inocybe maculata) (Frosty Fibrecap) microscope

In Jordans village in soil under Oak Jesper Launder spotted this pair of typical LBJs just pushing up and still with the diagnostic white 'veil' of the species covering the cap centre. Like many Fibrecaps it has a brown rather split cap revealing the white flesh beneath, the species name 'maculata' meaning spotted and referring to the veil which is often present though can be washed off by rain. This large mycorrhizal genus has recently been split into four (as with the Inkcaps) and nearly all species need a microscope to identify with any certainty.
Merismodes anomala  by Kerry Robinson July 28th Merismodes anomala (a Basidiomycete with no common name)

In the Mire at Burnham Beeches on a piece of fallen wood Kerry Robinson noticed a brown Corticioid-like patch which on closer inspection she recognised as this somewhat unusual and tiny species, one of the Cyphelloid fungi (those having disc- / tube- / cup-shaped fruitbodies resembling an Ascomycete but in fact belonging to the Basidiomycetes). A x 10 lens is needed to appreciate the detail in the field, seen here in Barry Webb's lovely photo.Though there are plenty of national records this is new to the site and only the second for the county.
Stemonitis axifera  by Barry Webb July 28th Stemonitis axifera (a Slime Mould with no common name) microscope

In Burnham Beeches on damp rotting deciduous wood Barry Webb found this small cluster of tiny 'pipe-cleaners', the sporangia being mature enough for Penny to be able to identify at home. The tiny smooth spores were diagnostic and though the species is not considered rare, this was new to the site with only one previous county record.
Trichia varia by Barry Webb July 28th Trichia varia microscope(a Slime Mould with no common name)

In Burnham Beeches on damp rotting deciduous wood Barry Webb found a colony of one of the commonest species of Trichia which was mature enough for Penny to be able to identify at home. This is genus with many somewhat similar species, most of which start out as a small patch of white blobby plasmodium which gradually turns yellow then dries off to form tight clusters of sporangia, some species with a short stalk, some without as here.
Kuehneromyces mutabilis  by Penny Cullington Kuehneromyces mutabilis  by Penny Cullington July 28th Kuehneromyces mutabilis (Sheathed Woodtuft)

Near the Mire in Burnham Beeches Bob Simpson found several clusters of this somewhat variable species on a pile of fallen deciduous wood. The caps were about 3 cms across but varied in colour from milky coffee to rich reddish brown, appearing like two different species. Often both colours appear on one cap (hence a previous common name, Two-tone Pholiota and its Latin species name meaning changeable). It has a ring on the stem and later in the year is easy to confuse with the very poisonous Galerina marginata (Funeral Bell) - that species also clusters on fallen wood but fruits much later in the season. (The photos are Penny's.)
Cantharellus cibarius  by Barry Webb July 28th Cantharellus cibarius (Chanterelle)

Near the Mire in Burnham Beeches Bob Simpson spotted a patch of these brightly coloured mushrooms in soil under mixed deciduous trees. (The photo is Barry Webb's but with Penny's camera!) Often an early season fruiter but never that common in the south of the country, it grows abundantly in Scotland. The beautiful apricot slightly felty caps with shallow decurrent thickish folds (hardly gills) underneath separate it from other lookalikes. Compare also with the similar C. ferruginascens (dated July 11th) which develops dark rusty stains where damaged.
Scleroderma citrinum by Penny Cullington Scleroderma citrinum by Penny Cullington July 28th Scleroderma citrinum (Common Earthball)

In Burnham Beeches several specimens of this species were just beginning to appear, this pair found by Gill Ferguson in longish grass under Birch and Oak. Told from other Earthballs by its pale ochre (hardly lemon yellow!) colour, its very tough leathery skin which soon develops a rough scaly surface and a rudimentary stem (see photo 2). It has an unpleasant smell and can get much larger than other species - up to 10(15)cms across when often misshapen. If you find it, look out for the Parasitic Bolete growing out from around its base, sometimes in clusters - an unusual sight. (The photo here is Penny's)
Xerula radicata  by Penny Cullington July 28th Xerula radicata (Rooting Shank)

In Burnham Beeches Barry Webb spotted these two mushrooms in soil but against visible Beech roots. This is a very common woodland species having a mid-brown wrinkled cap, often slimy after rain as here, and widely spaced white gills (sometimes sporting a dark gill edge). The stem is white and fibrous, the long root of which often attaches to submerged Beech roots and with care can be dug out. Not so here because the tree roots were on the surface! (The photo is Penny's.)

July 25th 2021

Clathrus ruber  by Jesper Lauder July 25th Clathrus ruber (Red Cage)

Found in a private garden in High Wycombe, then reported in a local nature group and there spotted by Jesper Launder who had identified it in the same spot last year, he revisited the site in order to take this photo. This is a rare and somewhat unusual fungus and new to the county. Closely related to C. archeri (which appeared on July 1st this year - see also in Finds Jul-Dec) and belonging with the Stinkhorns, it arises from a buried whitish gelatinous egglike structure which then ruptures and from which the amazing latticelike framework emerges. It can get to 10 cms across and has a revolting smell of carrion! If anyone finds it elsewhere, do please report it!
Claviceps purpurea  by Jesper Lauder Claviceps purpurea  by Jesper Lauder July 25th Claviceps purpurea Claviceps purpurea

On two different host grasses in meadowland between Jordans village and Chalfont St Giles Jesper Launder spotted this fungus which grows a large dark purple 'sclerotium' just prior to harvest time which, in the Middle Ages, was responsible for many deaths when harvested with rye and other related crops, causing the disease ergotism, also known as St. Anthony's Fire. Not rare but nowadays controllable, and more information about the disease is available online.
Russula farinipes  by Jesper Lauder Russula farinipes  by Jesper Lauder July 25th Russula farinipes (a Brittlegill with no common name)

Growing under Beech in Jordans village Jesper Launder noticed this unusual Brittlegill. It is probably the least common of the several species having yellow to ochre cap colours and in the field is easily separated from them by having a cuticle which doesn't peel at all. It tends to have a sticky cap and rather widely spaced whitish gills and favours Beech though can be found under other deciduous trees.
Russula violeipes  by Jesper Lauder July 25th Russula violeipes (Velvet Brittlegill) microscope

In a roadside verge in Jordans village Jesper Launder spotted several species of Russula growing under a mix of Oak, Beech and Birch. This particular species was probably associating with Oak or Beech and in some years can be quite common. The cap has a cuticle which is rather elastic and reluctant to peel - a feature worth noting because the cap colour is somewhat variable and often bright yellow (not so here, however). The stem is where the violet colour usually presents, though Jesper's specimens seem to have violet spotting on the cap which is quite unusual. Hopefully more typical collections will be found to further illustrate the species.
Russula exalbicans  by Jesper Lauder July 25th Russula exalbicans (Bleached Brittlegill) microscope

In a roadside verge in Jordans village Jesper Launder spotted several species of Russula growing under a mix of Oak, Beech and Birch. This particular species associates with Birch and not that common in our area though we have a handful of sites where it's been recorded. The cap tends to fade, sometimes becoming a bit greenish to almost colourless except for a rim of pink around the margin, hence its common name.

July 22nd 2021

Calvatia gigantea  by Joanna Dodsworth July 22nd Calvatia gigantea (Giant Puffball)

In a grassy part of the Wotton Park Estate Joanna Dodsworth saw this large white football peeping above the longish grass and knew what it must be. Previously in the genus Handkea, also Langermannia, this is indeed a giant amongst fungi and can get to half a meter across (if left unmolested by nibbling animals or kicking humans!). It fruits in open areas, farmland in summer, sometimes in large numbers and Joanna's car keys give an idea of size, so although probably a good 20 cms across this specimen still has some growing to do though it's clear some animal has been munching at it already. This species is well worth looking out for now.
Ganoderma australe  by Joanna Dodsworth Ganoderma australe  by Joanna Dodsworth July 22nd Ganoderma australe (Southern Bracket)

On felled Poplar in Wotton Park Estate Joanna Dodsworth saw these nice examples of one of our commonest brackets. Each bracket was about 15 cms across and they show the brown lumpy upper surface, white border around the rim and finely pored white underside - all typical features. Note also (particularly in photo 2) the chocolate spore deposit liberally coating not just the fungi but also the surrounding vegetation. G. applanatum (Artist's Bracket) is extremely similar and can often be separated in the field by the presence of telltale insect galls on the underside - clearly not seen here. The safest way to split them, however, is by spores size.

July 21st 2021

Fuligo septica var. flava  by Penny Cullington Fuligo septica var. flava  by Penny Cullington July 21st Fuligo septica var. flava (Scrambled Egg Slime Mould)

Failing to find anything 'mushroom' shaped at Turville Heath (no surprise in this very hot spell) Penny could do no better than a common slime mould, a common corticioid and a common ascomycete! Found in an old Oak stump, herewith a rather unusual specimen of perhaps the commonest slime mould which seemed to have become disjointed into many different lumps. On touching one it disintegrated into a dark chocolate powder (spore mass), showing that it was at the mature stage. This can be seen in the close-up photo where the yellow surface is disrupting and dry.
Hypoxylon fuscum  by Penny Cullington July 21st Hypoxylon fuscum (Hazel Woodwart)

On the same stack of dead branches in Turville Heath Penny noticed a colony of brown to blackish crusty lumps on Hazel. This is as common as - and also very similar to - H. fragiforme (Beech Woodwart) though obviously both species are dependent on the presence of dead or dying branches of their host tree.
Cylindrobasidium laeve  by Penny Cullington Cylindrobasidium laeve  by Penny Cullington July 21st Cylindrobasidium laeve (= evolvens) (Tear Dropper) microscope

On a stack of dead deciduous branches in Turville Heath Penny noticed this patch of buff to pink-orange corticioid (flat fungus) which was white and peeling around the edges and forming small bracketlike extensions in places. The species gets its common name from its tear-shaped spores and when fresh and moist it is quite supple and peels off the substrate easily - a useful field character. Today's was, however, somewhat baked and neither peeled nor (when examined at home) produced any spores!

July 19th 2021

Cyanoboletus pulverulentus  by Jesper Lauder Cyanoboletus pulverulentus  by Jesper Lauder July 19th Cyanoboletus pulverulentus (Inkstain Bolete)

In his garden in Jordans village Jesper Launder looks for this striking and uncommon species every autumn where it comes up regularly under Beech and Hazel - see also in Finds 2020 dated Sept 21st). Here it was again fruiting very early this year. Previously in the genus Boletus, this is one of several species in which the flesh when exposed to the air turns instantly blue (shown in photo 2). This particular species, however, has yellow pores rather than the red of the much more common Scarletina Bolete, and is also notable for the deep almost blue-black colour it develops on bruised pores and stem as well as in the flesh - it is in fact the darkest staining Bolete, hence its common name. It occurs under deciduous trees, favouring Beech and Oak.
Pleurotus ostreatus  by Penny Cullington Pleurotus ostreatus  by Penny Cullington Pleurotus ostreatus  by Claire Williams Pleurotus ostreatus  by Claire Williams July 19th Pleurotus ostreatus (Oyster Mushroom)

On a fallen Beech trunk in Burnham Beeches Penny found several large fresh clusters of this very common species. Its colour is somewhat variable and when really pale as here it can be tricky to tell apart from the less common P. cornucopiae (Branching Oyster) - also pale though a slightly creamier white. Noting how far down the stem the gills run is the best way: see in photo 2 that they are decurrent, reaching down the stem, but then soon die out - in P. cornucopiae they are more prominent and widely spaced as well as continuing much further down the stem. Photos 3 and 4 are of Claire Williams's similarly very pale collection from Downley Wood a few days later.
Erysiphe alphitoides  by Penny Cullington July 19th Erysiphe alphitoides (Oak Mildew)

On the living leaves of many Oaks in Burnham Beeches Penny saw this very common mildew seen in summer and autumn. There are many species of this genus and this one can be named purely through it being on Oak leaves though it also can occur on Sweet Chestnut and (very rarely) on Beech as well.
Scleroderma verrucosum by Penny Cullington Scleroderma verrucosum by Penny Cullington July 19th Scleroderma verrucosum (Scaly Earthball) microscope

On the edge of a large woodchip pile near Oak in Burnham Beeches Penny found her first Earthball of the season. Hardly likely to be mistaken for a Puffball when mature as here, the irregular shape and dirty brown colour with irregular pock marks, also the stem with debris interwoven into the mycelium at its base (photo 2) are typical. A common species usually associated with Oak.
Russula subfoetens by Penny Cullington Russula subfoetens by Penny Cullington July 19th Russula subfoetens (a Brittlegill with no common name)

In a grassy glade at Burnham Beeches Penny found two species of Brittlegill in soil near Birch and Oak. Both were fairly damaged as is often the case when this genus first makes an appearance, being a favourite with squirrels, mice and slugs amongst other nibblers, so are not looking their best, in fact the cap surface of the large specimen here has been mostly eaten away. R. subfoetens (as its name suggests) is another member of 'The Smellies' (see also R. amoenolens 3 days earlier) and very similar to R. foetens (Stinking Brittlegill). Both species are quite large and bulky with ochre yellow–brown caps which are sticky (an unusual Brittlegill character), very brittle gills and an unpleasant rancid smell. They are best told apart by a drop of KOH on the stem flesh: golden yellow in subfoetens and dirty brown in foetens. Todays species is probably the commoner of the two in the south.

July 18 2021

Lactarius circellatus  by Jesper Lauder July 18th Lactarius circellatus (a Milkcap with no common name)

The genus Lactarius is not usually one that fruits early in the season but Jesper Launder noticed this nice group growing under Hornbeam, its host tree in Jordans village. This is not a common species and characterised by the palish greenish grey zoned cap, pink buff gills oozing copious milk when damaged, a fruity smell and of course only found under Hornbeam. We have records from just six county sites, the earliest date being the end of September, so this is an interesting find.
Clitopilus prunulus  by Jesper Lauder July 18 Clitopilus prunulus (The Miller)

Whilst walking on Beaconsfield Golf Course Jesper Launder found this collection of common early grassland mushroom, often found in grassy woodland glades as well. The caps are white and have a soft kid glove feel to them, the gills are pale pink and somewhat decurrent, the stems are also white and once picked they have a distinctive mealy smell (hence the common name). Considered by some a good edible species, beware because it is easily confused with a very similar and very poisonous species of grassland Clitocybe!

July 17th 2021

Parasola auricoma  by Jackie Ewan Parasola auricoma  by Jackie Ewan July 17th Parasola auricoma (an Inkcap with no common name) microscope

In grassy soil at Stampwell Farm Jackie Ewan noticed these Inkcaps clearly from the Parasola genus (having very thin flesh, caps fluted like a parasol and lacking the deliquescing character of other Inkcap genera). The tendency is to assume that all such collections are P. plicatilis (Pleated Inkcap), considered very common and a species mainly of lawns. Less well known are the several very similar species which occur in other habitats and substrates and though appearing extremely similar have differently shaped spores and other microscopic characters. Lacking any detailed information on the genus, Jackie asked for help whereupon Penny suggested she searched in the cap cuticle (with a scope) for the amazingly long, thick-walled golden brown hairs found only in this particular parasol-like species. Bingo! Identification solved. Not rare, we have 15 previous records, half of which are from Derek's Whitchurch garden! The species occurs in soil / woodchip / submerged woody remains sometimes in lawns, and ends to be a little bigger than other Parasola species.

July 16th 2021

Gymnopus luxurians  by Penny Cullington Gymnopus luxurians  by Penny Cullington July 16th Gymnopus luxurians (a rare Toughshank with no common name) microscope

On a lawn in Stoke Poges Memorial Gardens when Penny was looking for early Waxcaps she came across a cluster of these brown capped mushrooms which rang no bell but which reminded her of the genus Gymnopus being somewhat flexible with crowded pale gills. At home she discovered this species which seemed to fit well including the microscopic characters but was not a name she knew, and on further investigation discovered it is an American species, possibly introduced here with only a handful of UK records, mostly from Kew Gardens in hothouses, also very rare in Europe. So this is new to the county and as the few British collections may not yet have been sequenced it may possibly prove to be different from the American species. It is now dropping a sporeprint and being dried with a view to getting it sequenced.
Gyroporus castaneus  by Penny Cullington Gyroporus castaneus  by Penny Cullington July 16th Gyroporus castaneus (Chestnut Bolete)

At Stoke Poges Memorial Gardens in grass under Oak Penny found just a singleton of this occasional and distinctive species, an easy Bolete to recognise in the field having a chestnut cap and matching stem with contrasting off-white pores which don't turn blue when pressed. It occurs under mature Oak and Sweet Chestnut and develops hollows in the stem visible when sliced lengthways. (Penny tried this today but the whole stem was just a mass of maggots!) We have many records from Hodgemoor Woods and a few from elsewhere in the county but none previously found in July.
Russula amoenolens  by Penny Cullington Russula amoenolens  by Penny Cullington July 16th Russula amoenolens (Camembert Brittlegill)

At Stoke Poges Memorial Gardens in grass under Oak Penny found this Brittlegill, a member of a group of this genus affectionately known as 'The Smellies'! They mostly are mycorrhizal with Oak, have brown cap colours and - needless to say - unusual or unpleasant smells. This particular species is very similar to R. sororia (Sepia Brittlegill) and in fact incorrectly named as this for many years until it became known that the two could be split with the use of Guaiac on the stem: no reaction in R. sororia but instantly strongly blue in R. amoeolens as seen in photo 2. We now know that today's species is by far the commoner of the two. They share the strongly striate cap margin, dull grey brown colours, association with Oak and an unpleasant sour to cheesy smell.

July 15th 2021

Epichloe typhina by Jackie Ewan July 15th Epichloe typhina (Choke Disease)

On a grass stem at Stampwell Farm Jackie Ewan found and identified this summer fruiting species which apparently occurs on many different grasses, starting out white and yellowing as it matures. Though common this is only our second county record reflecting how we tend to focus on woodland autumn season fungi, no doubt overlooking many common things which occur else where at other times of year.
Bolbitius titubans  by Penny Cullington July 15th Bolbitius titubans (Yellow Fieldcap)

At Cadmore End Penny found a collection of this common grassland species in roughly mown grass. It has a sticky cap which one can tell from the bits of dead grass adhering to the tall specimen here, and the bright egg yellow cap colour when young gradually fades as it matures. Possibly confusable with one of the yellow Waxcaps when young, a sporeprint will soon eliminate that genus: white in Waxcaps but distinctly brown in Bolbitius.
Russula odorata  by Penny Cullington July 15th Russula odorata (a Brittlegill with no common name) microscope

At Cadmore End under a large Oak Penny found two specimens of a pink Russula and noticing that the gills were developing a deep cream colour she knew it was an interesting species. The reaction on the stem with a ferrous sulphate crystal was pale salmon (seen in the upturned specimen), with Guaiac at home was instantly bright blue, it had a sweet fruity smell, a mild taste and the cap cuticle peeled almost to the centre. These clues plus a sporeprint for colour and other microscopic features confirmed it as this unusual species, one which is mycorrhizal with Oak. Compare with Penny's photos of R. vesca, dated July 12th - another pink species!
Marasmiellus vaillantii  by Penny Cullington July 15th Marasmiellus vaillantii (Goblet Parachute) microscope

At Cadmore End under a large Oak Penny noticed many of these little white mushrooms in grass and at first glance suspected they might be on woody remains and therefore probably Marasmius rotula (Collared Parachute). Closer inspection showed they were mostly on decaying grass cuttings and also turning one over revealed no collar around the top of the stem to which the gills in M. rotula would be attached, and the gills were clearly joined to the stem. Checking with a scope at home confirmed the species, not rare and with plenty of county records mostly with this same grassy substrate
Leccinum variicolor by Penny Cullington Leccinum variicolor by Penny Cullington Leccinum variicolor by Penny Cullington July 15th Leccinum variicolor (Mottled Bolete) microscope

In grassy soil under Birch at Stoke Common Penny found just one Leccinum specimen and knew she'd need to take it home to work on to identify to species. She scratched the stem base on collection and saw no signs of blue-green staining at the time, but later on close inspection there were clear signs of this colour at the base. This together with the cap flesh turning slightly pink, the dark brown-black 'scabers' on the stem and examination of the cap cuticle with a scope confirmed it as the fairly common L. variicolor rather than the even more common L. scabrum. (These colour changes often take an hour or so to develop.) Both species together with most members of this genus of Boletes are mycorrhizal with Birch but one should always note the tree host because a few species associate with other trees: Oak, Hornbeam, Aspen or Poplar, giving a vital clue to determination.
Trametes versicolor    by Penny Cullington July 15th Trametes versicolor (Turkeytail)

In Stoke Common on a Birch stump Penny found a nice fresh fruiting of this very common bracket - so common that one can almost list it (together with Stereum hirsutum - Hairy Curtain Crust) as one enters deciduous woodland without actually seeing it! It's bound to be on fallen wood somewhere. To be certain of naming it correctly one should, however, look at the underside of a piece to make sure that it's just plain cream with small pores and not orange and smooth (i.e. S. hirsutum) or grey with a white border (i.e. Bjerkandera adusta - Smokey Bracket and almost as common). The top surface of this last can sometimes look identical to Turkeytail with similar zoning.
Hygrocybe quieta  by Jackie Ewan July 15th Hygrocybe quieta (Oily Waxcap) microscope

In a grassy area at Stampwell Farm Jackie Ewan found yet more Waxcaps though she was unsure of the species - there were several possible orange capped candidates and it was not until Penny suggested cutting one in half and rubbing it to see if she could detect an oily smell similar to Lactarius quietus that the species became clear, the spores when checked confirming it. Not rare but possibly misidentified as the smell is often not obvious, this is now our fifth July Waxcap species which could be a record for this month in the county.

July 13th 2021

Inosperma adaequatum  by Joanna Dodsworth July 13th Inosperma adaequatum (previously Inocybe adaequata - a species of Fibrecap with no common name) microscope

In Wotton Park Estate under mixed deciduous trees Joanna Dodsworth found this pair of Fibrecaps, an unusual though not really rare species for which we have just six records from three different sites. The genus Inocybe - a large one recently divided into four for UK species (more worldwide) - is one which almost always needs a scope to identify to species, but this particular member is recognisable in the field from its scaly cap surface and tendency to turn pinkish red, particularly on the rather fibrillose stem (visible in the photo). It also has an unusual smell: somewhat spermatic (as in many Fibrecaps) but with an earthy beetroot component. It can get quite big for this group of LBJs, up to 7-8 cms across.
Entoloma griseocyaneum  by Penny Cullington Entoloma griseocyaneum  by Penny Cullington Entoloma griseocyaneum  by Penny Cullington July 13th Entoloma griseocyaneum (Felted Pinkgill) microscope

In thick grass at Coombe Hill Penny found a couple of collections of an Entoloma which needed work at home to identify - almost always the case with this genus. It did, however, have a distinctive cap with an almost powdered look to it which on close inspection revealed scales which became increasingly smaller from the centre outwards. Furthermore, the stem had a silvery violaceous glint, and these features together with the microscopic details led her to the name. Though not uncommon nationally, this appears to be new to the county perhaps reflecting that local mycologists tend to look less closely at grassland this early in the season.
Bovista plumbea  by Penny Cullington July 13th Bovista plumbea (Grey Puffball)

At Coombe Hill Penny found literally hundreds of these Puffballs in grass, when young as here white and not grey as the name suggests. At this stage they are somewhat similar to Lycoperdon pratense (Meadow Puffball) which, however is less smooth and more like L perlatum on the surface. When older the surface of this Bovista cracks and peels off in distinct pieces leaving a thin greyish skin covering the spore mass, the whole then detaching from the ground and blowing about to disperse its spores. The left hand specimen in the photo shows the slightly pleated stemless base.
Panaeolina foenisecii  by Penny Cullington July 13th Panaeolina foenisecii (Brown Mottlegill) microscope

At Coombe Hill Penny found this typical grassland species, a very common LBJ in garden lawns and sometimes called Mower's Mottlegill for that reason. It is often quite small with caps around 1 cm across, but today's were up to 3 cms and also somewhat crazed on the surface which confused Penny in the field thus necessitating a scope to make the identification. The name 'Brown' refers not to the cap but to the sporeprint colour which differs from other Mottlegills (in the genus Panaeolus) which have a darker almost purpleblack sporeprint, this being the reason why the species was moved from that genus into the specially created Panaeolina.
Panaeolus papilionaceus  by Penny Cullington July 13th Panaeolus papilionaceus (Petticoat Mottlegill)

On manured soil in thick grass at Coombe Hill Penny found a couple of individuals of this distinctive dung-loving LBJ (probably more familiar as P. sphinctrinus). Caps were only about 1 cm across but the stems can be very long in comparison depending on the surrounding vegetation. The remarkably regular frilly veil remnants around the cap margin make the species nameable in the field, but this becomes far less easy in older specimens when they've disappeared.
Calocybe carnea  by Penny Cullington Calocybe carnea  by Penny Cullington July 13th Calocybe carnea (Pink Domecap)

In deep grass and vegetation at Coombe Hill Penny found a few of these pretty pink capped mushrooms. Not uncommon given its grassland habitat, the species is quite easy to recognise in the field, having a matching pink stem but contrasting white gills. They are usually quite small but can get to about 3 cms across.
Suillellus luridus  by Penny Cullington Suillellus luridus  by Penny Cullington July 13th Suillellus luridus (Lurid Bolete)

Prompted by husband Paul who reported dozens of fruit bodies of this species growing with the Helianthemum in Aston Rowant Reserve (Oxfordshire, however), Penny visited Coombe Hill - another good Helianthemum site but in Bucks - and was suitably rewarded with our first Bolete of the season. The species is similar to Scarletina Bolete (Neoboletus luridiformis) in having red pores and flesh staining strongly blue and can also be found, as that species, in deciduous woodland, but together with Rooting Bolete (Caloboletus radicans) it has a clear affinity with Helianthemum in open grassland as indeed do many other fungi from a variety of mycorrhizal genera. This seems to be our first July record with this host but Penny suspects that it is not unusual for it to be fruiting this early as we have records as early as June when found in woodland. Photo 2 shows the instant blueing on the pores when pressed with a finger.

July 12th 2021

Hygrocybe cantharellus  by Jackie Ewan July 12th Hygrocybe cantharellus (Goblet Waxcap) microscope

In a grassy area at Stampwell Farm and near to other Waxcap species Jackie Ewan found a patch of this attractive species, one for which we have only four previous county records though it is not classed as rare. The dry orange cap and strongly decurrent gills make the species recognisable in the field so it would be good to find more sites for it. Our list of early fruiting Waxcaps is growing steadily at the moment!
Hygrocybe miniata  by Jackie Ewan July 12th Hygrocybe miniata (Vermillion Waxcap) microscope

In a grassy area at Stampwell Farm Jackie Ewan found these small brightly coloured Waxcaps fruiting unseasonally early. Told from other red members of the genus by its dry and somewhat scurfy cap surface and contrasting paler gills, it is quite a common species but found most frequently in later autumn!
Didymium nigripes  by Claire Williams Didymium nigripes  by Claire Williams Didymium nigripes  by Claire Williams July 12th Didymium nigripes (a Slime Mould with no common name)

On a dead Beech leaf in Downley Wood Claire Williams spotted this cluster of extremely small organisms (see photo 3 to give an idea of scale). The identification from her excellent photos was given her on the Slime Mould facebook page, the name referring to the particularly dark stalk in this member of a very large and tricky genus. (See another image amongst Barry Webb's photos.) We have just two previous county records - one of these Barry's from last year - but the species is not rare, just tiny and easily overlooked. It seems we have a second outstanding photographer amongst our number!
Conocybe rugosa  by Jackie Ewan Conocybe rugosa  by Jackie Ewan July 12th Conocybe rugosa (a species of Conecap with no common name) microscope

At Stampwell Farm Jackie Ewan found this small LBJ under a gooseberry bush in a grassy vegetable patch, it being one of quite a few species within this large genus which have a ring on the stem (soon possibly to be established as the new genus Pholiotina). This particular species has a wrinkled (rugulose) cap surface and the stem ring has a fluted (striate) upper surface, both features just visible in photo 2. It normally occurs in grassy areas, also in grassy woodland paths and is considered an occasional species.
Entoloma chalybeum var. lazulinum  by Jackie Ewan July 12th Entoloma chalybeum var. lazulinum (Indigo Pinkgill) microscope

At Stampwell Farm in a grassy area Jackie Ewan found several clusters of this quite rare and beautiful species. This is a species from Section Leptonia within this large and very tricky genus, having dark blue colours in both the cap and stem and in this case also in the gills when young (though later they become pink from the spores). We have just two county records of E. chalybeum but none of this variety, separated from the type by having translucent striations in the outer part of the cap, seen here clearly in the broken cap on the left of the photo.
Hygrocybe glutinipes  by Jackie Ewan July 12th Hygrocybe glutinipes (Glutinous Waxcap)

In grassland at Stampwell Farm Jackie Ewan found this small Waxcap fruiting somewhat early in the season. It is separated in the field from other very similar species by having not only a very sticky cap but also a very sticky stem. H. inspida could be confused with it but has a stem which is no more than moist when fresh (not really viscid), gills which tend to be decurrent and usually red colours in the stem.
Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa  by Claire Williams July 12th Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa (a Slime Mould with no common name)

In Downley Wood Claire Williams found this pretty and quite common Slime Mould on rotting wood. It favours old conifer stumps but also occurs on other woods which are suitably damp and decaying. See more photos of this amongst Barry Webb's Slime Mould photos.
Scutellinia subhirtella  by Claire Williams Scutellinia subhirtella  by Claire Williams July 12th Scutellinia subhirtella (a species of Eyelash with no common name) microscope

In Downley Woods Claire Williams found these tiny brightly coloured cups on rotting wood in a damp location and noticed that not only were the cups more yellowish orange than red but that the marginal hairs looked rather short for the common S. scutellata. She took the opportunity when visiting Penny with a bracket from the same site (also included today) to take her this Eyelash fungus which Penny was then able to identify working through various keys etc. We've recorded the species at only three previous sites, so this was a nice find.
Hapalopilus nidulans  by Claire Williams Hapalopilus nidulans  by Claire Williams Hapalopilus nidulans  by Claire Williams Hapalopilus nidulans  by Claire Williams July 12th Hapalopilus nidulans (Cinnamon Bracket)

A few weeks back Claire Williams sent Penny photo 1 of an immature bracket found on rotting deciduous wood in Downley Woods. Unable to name it, Penny suggested Claire return to the site when it had developed further and the result was photos 2 and 3 taken today which made determination much easier. This is a bracket for which we have about 10 county records but none since 2010 thus conspicuous by its absence in recent years. The species has several redeeming features: it is soft and quite pliable and is the same buffy colour both above and below, having quite distinct pores underneath. The most useful and conclusive feature, however, is that a drop of the chemical KOH turns instantly purple! So to make the determination secure Claire took a sample over to Penny, the result being photo 4.
Amanita rubescens var. annulosulphurea  by Penny Cullington Amanita rubescens var. annulosulphurea  by Penny Cullington Amanita rubescens var. annulosulphurea  by Penny Cullington July 12th Amanita rubescens var. annulosulphurea (Blusher)

Under Oak in Burnham Beeches Penny found a couple of specimens of this species though neither looked very typical. A. rubescens often confuses people if just the cap colour and markings are observed because they can be so variable, and from a distance today's looked more like A. fulva with brown shades. Close to, however, the scaly cap surface and lack of fluting at the edge eliminated that species (compare with the photos of A. fulva also found today) and when the stem was exposed it was obvious from the skirtlike ring with striations on the upper surface (see photo 3) and pink staining at the swollen base that it was a Blusher. In this particular case the ring was clearly primrose yellow rather than white, hence the varietal name given here - not rare but certainly much less common than the type species.
Amanita fulva  by Penny Cullington Amanita fulva  by Penny Cullington July 12th Amanita fulva (Tawny Grisette)

In Burnham Beeches under Birch and Pine Penny found just one specimen of this common Amanita which often fruits early in the season. Features to look for: the lack of veil flecks on the cap which has a distinctly fluted margin, the tapering stem which lacks a ring and has (if carefully extricated) a fragile saclike volva flecked with the tawny cap colour. If you find one with the above features but a pure white volva you probably have something much more interesting!
Russula vesca  by Penny Cullington Russula vesca  by Penny Cullington Russula vesca  by Jesper Lauder July 12th Russula vesca (The Flirt)

In Burnham Beeches under Oak Penny was not surprised to find this member of the Brittlegills - a genus which tends to be amongst the first of the Autumn woodland genera to make an appearance. Photo 1 shows a rather pale pink cap where the edges are just beginning to recede thus revealing the white gills beneath (suggesting a petticoat showing under a lady's skirt - hence the common name!). Photo 2 shows this pale specimen upturned and rubbed (stem and gills) with a crystal of ferrous sulphate, together with a younger specimen having a much darker typically smoked gammon pink cap, illustrating the varied cap colour of the species. The crystal is a useful tool because amongst the many pink capped species of the genus R. vesca is alone in reacting so positively - both on stem and gills - giving a deep rusty salmon pink stain instantly to confirm its determination in the field. Photo 3 is of a more mature specimen found by Jesper Launder in Jordans village 10 days later and showing a generous and flirtatious amount of petticoat!
Agrocybe pediades  by Penny Cullington July 12th Agrocybe pediades (Common Fieldcap) microscope

In the grassy area near the main car park in Burnham Beeches Penny found several of these small ochre capped mushrooms, no more than 1.5 cms across. A fairly typical pale LBJ, caps are smooth and slightly sticky, gills are palish brown and the stem is ringless (some others in the genus can have a ring on the stem). This is quite a common summertime grassland species and seems to have been particularly in evidence this year, though we appear to have only four county sites for it, it surprisingly being new today for Burnham Beeches.

July 11th 2021

Cantharellus ferruginascens  by Greg Douglas July 11th Cantharellus ferruginascens (Pale Chanterelle)

In Captains Wood nr Chesham under Beech Greg Douglas noticed these somewhat pale Chanterelles and at first assumed they were just C. cibarius - the commonest species of the genus though never prolific in this area of the country. However, it soon became obvious that they were staining rusty brown where handled or damaged so he wondered if they could be this much less frequently encountered and closely related species. He brought them along to our AGM that afternoon where Penny and Derek agreed on his determination. The species is previously known only from Burnham Beeches and Hodgemoor Woods but may well be more common than we realise - certainly one to be looking out for now when many early season species seem to be making an appearance.
Melanoleuca verrucipes  by Joanna Dodsworth Melanoleuca verrucipes  by Joanna Dodsworth July 11th Melanoleuca verrucipes (Warty Cavalier)

On a woodchip pile in Brill Common (composed of diseased Horse Chestnut) Joanna Dodsworth noticed this impressive clump of unfamiliar white mushrooms, up to 12 cm across or more. She brought a specimen to share with attendees at our AGM that afternoon where Penny was able to name it having become familiar with the species from a large woodchip pile in Burnham Beeches where she recorded it nearly every year from 2003-2009, varying between the months of May to October. It has not been found in the county since then so this was a nice find. The distinctive features to note are the white cap which becomes finely scaly with age, the crowded slightly cream gills, a faint sweet smell of aniseed and most notably a short white stem pocked with black warts (similar to those found on the genus Leccinum).
Phallus impudicus var. togatus  by Jesper Lauder Phallus impudicus var. togatus  by Jesper Lauder July 11th Phallus impudicus var. togatus (Stinkhorn)

At the bottom of his Jordans garden this morning Jesper Launder noticed this interesting variety of our common Stinkhorn which has the beginnings of a delicate white network developing just under the green spore-bearing head (know as an indusium - see photo 2). This variety is not common and we have just one previous record from Bradenham Wood in 2004. There exists another very impressive species, P. indusiatus, which has a complete network, though very rare in this country it is quite common in subtropical areas. Try Googling the latin name for some wonderful images.

July 9th 2021

Mycena tenerrima  by Barry Webb July 9th Mycena tenerrima (Frosty Bonnet)

On fallen Birch in Burnham Beeches Barry Webb noticed this attractive cluster of tiny white Bonnets which of necessity needed to grow out from the wood before turning upwards to enable the spores to fall from the gills at the usual angle. There are several quite similar tiny white Bonnets, nearly always needing a scope to identify with safety, but the intense frosting on both cap and gills, also the small disc just visible at the base of the two joined stems, are sufficient in this case to make the determination.
 Pluteus sp. chrysophaeus  by Barry Webb July 9th Pluteus sp. chrysophaeus (Yellow Shield)

On fallen Beech in Burnham Beeches Barry Webb found this attractive trio of young Shields. As there is more than one yellow species in the genus and this particular collection was not examined with a scope, Penny cannot be positive of her determination (hence the sp. above). However, the other two species are either rare or not yet British and we fairly often find P. chrysophaeus in the county so she feels fairly secure here. (The species name seems about to change to P. chrysophlebius as in Kibby vol 2.)
Cribraria rufa by Barry Webb Cribraria rufa by Barry Webb July 9th Cribraria rufa (a Slime Mould with no common name)

On fallen rotting Pine in Burnham Beeches Barry Webb found this tiny but beautiful species, one which is new to the site and was new to the county when Barry found it last September in Penn Wood (see in Finds 2020 dated Sept 20th). Photo 1 clearly shows the large cup at the base from which the meshlike network spreads - typical of this species, though in photo 2, of mature fruiting heads and taken a day later, the cup is reduced and the network more pronounced.
Gymnopus fusipes  by Jackie Ewan Gymnopus fusipes  by Claire Williams July 9th Gymnopus fusipes (Spindle Toughshank)

At Stampwell Farm at the base of a mature Beech Jackie Ewan found this distinctive clustered species. Previously in the genus Collybia, the species occurs most frequently around the base of Oak in mature woodland but also with Beech and is typified by its tan coloured rounded cap, widely spaced pale gills and flexible stem which tapers strongly downwards, most frequently fusing into a tight clump. Photo 2 is of Claire Williams's collection from Downley Wood a couple of weeks later, showing the fusing stems well and also the typical rather blotchy brown caps.
Hygrocybe conica  by Jackie Ewan July 9th Hygrocybe conica (Blackening Waxcap)

In a grassy area at Stampwell Farm Jackie Ewan found this species, the first example of which was found on July 8th - yet another case of a particular species showing up in one place and promptly appearing elsewhere. This is obviously no coincidence and happens time and time again - something which has come to light since we introduced our series of Members' Finds.
Rickenella fibula  by Jackie Ewan July 9th Rickenella fibula (Orange Mosscap)

In short mossy grass at Stampwell Farm Jackie Ewan found this tiny and common species, one that at first glance could be a small Mycena (Bonnet) especially M. acicula which also has an orange cap, It differs, however, in lacking the contrasting bright yellow stem of that species and also has remarkably decurrent gills. It is common in moss everywhere. See also the less common R. swartzii (in Finds 21 Jan to June dated June 30th) which is similar but a completely different colour.
Balsamia platyspora  by Jesper Lauder Balsamia platyspora  by Jesper Lauder July 9th Balsamia platyspora (Broad-spored Balsamia a truffle) microscope

Whilst isolating in his Jordan garden Jesper Launder found this rarely recorded truffle in grassy soil under Beech and Lime. This is apparently a small brown warty truffle (seen here sitting on a Lime leaf for perspective) with a pale veined interior and - being a member of the Ascomycetes - it has unusual asci which are balloon-shaped with clusters of ellipsoid spores. We have just one previous county record, from Derek's Whitchurch garden 10 years ago found by truffle expert Carol Hobart who was dogsitting whilst they were on holiday!

July 8th 2021

Agaricus xanthodermus  by Joanna Dodsworth Agaricus xanthodermus  by Joanna Dodsworth July 8th Agaricus xanthodermus (Yellow Stainer)

In Rushbeds Wood Joanna Dodsworth found these mushrooms which are showing no signs of yellowing on the cap or side of the stem. But at home when she cut one open (photo 2) the telltale chrome yellow staining at the stem base was conclusive. The species also has an unpleasant smell of old fashioned ink (phenol) rather than the familiar sweet 'mushroomy' smell of many white (edible) mushroom species. This is one to be avoided and can cause gastric upsets.
Tremella mesenterica  by Joanna Dodsworth July 8th Tremella mesenterica (Yellow Brain)

In Rushbeds Wood Joanna Dodsworth noticed this brightly coloured jelly fungus on a fallen deciduous stick (which looks possibly more like Ash rather than Oak - the wood on which it is commonly found).
Hygrocybe conica  by Joanna Dodsworth July 8th Hygrocybe conica (Blackening Waxcap)

In Rushbeds Wood Joanna Dodsworth was surprised to find this very early fruiting singleton just emerging in a grassy ride - it was only 3cms tall but even at this stage is showing signs of the telltale blackening typical of the species. Glancing through our many records, most are in October or November but we do have a smattering from earlier months including one on July 1st, so although it's an unusual find at this time it's not unheard of and presumably reflects the unseasonal weather we've been experiencing recently.
Coprinellus disseminatus  by Joanna Dodsworth July 8th Coprinellus disseminatus (Fairy Inkcap)

In Rushbeds Wood Joanna Dodsworth found quite a few different fungi beginning to fruit as well as this nice colony of Inkcaps. This is a common species associated with rotting wood or submerged roots, and comes up at any time of year when conditions are suitable, often in very large numbers. Another common name for the species is Crumble Caps, perhaps reflecting the speed - just a day or so - with which they appear, develop and then quickly disappear again, this being a notable feature of the genus.

July 6th 2021

Lycogala conicum  by Barry Webb Lycogala conicum  by Barry Webb July 6th Lycogala conicum (a Slime Mould with no common name)

On fallen rotting Birch at Burnham Beeches Barry Webb found this rare species, similar to the very common and familiar L. terrestre (Wolf's Milk) but instantly separable from it by its very distinctive conical egg shape. As with the (much) commoner species the plasmodium stage is pink, as are the developing sporocarps (fruiting bodies) which as they mature and dry off become gradually grey buff. Photo 2 (taken of a collection on a different Birch nearby found 10 days later) shows mature sporocarps. New to the site and the county, there appear to be under 20 national records of this species, so it was an exciting find. (two)
Collaria (= Lamproderma) arcyrionema by Barry Webb Collaria (= Lamproderma) arcyrionema by Barry Webb Collaria (= Lamproderma) arcyrionema by Barry Webb July 6th Collaria (= Lamproderma) arcyrionema (a Slime Mould with no common name)

On fallen rotting Pine in Burnham Beeches Barry Webb found this pretty little sparkling species, a rare find which is new not only to the site but also to the county. This genus, four species of which are British, is split off from the similar Lamproderma on account of the small skirtlike collar which remains at the base of the sporangium (fruiting head - see photo 3) The iridescent heads are at first silvery, then become more bronze in colour. Photo 2 (taken of a collection found 6 days later in the same area on a different Pine) is more mature and thus bronze. Bear in mind that the entire sporocarp is at most 2.5 mm high!
Cribraria cancellata  by Barry Webb July 6th Cribraria cancellata (a Slime Mould with no common name)

On fallen rotting Pine in Burnham Beeches Barry Webb found this tiny but beautiful species which is new to the site and with just one previous county record: from Salcey Forest, 1991, found by the distinguished Myxomycete specialist Bruce Ing (so Barry is in good company!). All species in the genus have this amazing meshlike network surrounding the head, particularly marked in this species which has purple black plasmodium and a long dark tapering stalk when developed as here. Compare with others from the genus on Barry's separate webpage full of brilliant photos and available in Members' Finds.
Volvariella bombycina  by John Catterson Volvariella bombycina  by John Catterson July 6th Volvariella bombycina (Silky Rosegill)

In Hughenden Park John Catterson found several fruitbodies of this interesting species just emerging in the decaying part of an otherwise living Horse Chestnut - the same tree where he discovered it last year (see in Finds 2020 dated Aug 28th). Closely related to the genus Pluteus with which it shares the pink spores and free pink gills, the key feature to look for in the field which separates it from that genus is the presence of a volva (sac) at the stem base, best seen in young material as here. This is the only member of its genus found on wood and can grow to a good size (over 12 cms across) and though not common it can safely be identified in the field by its combination of pale cap covered in coarse silky hairs together with the features already mentioned above.

July 5th 2021

Cribraria aurantiaca  by Barry Webb July 5th Cribraria aurantiaca (a Slime Mould with no common name)

On fallen rotting Birch in Burnham Beeches Barry Webb found this tiny but beautiful species which (surprisingly) has bright green plasmodium and as it develops to form fruiting bodies the colour of the heads changes thru green ( as here) to blue and eventually to yellow ochre retaining this amazing mesh / network which characterises the genus (like a crib?). The stalk is a bright orange to reddish brown, it also tapers upwards notably. This was new not only to the site but to the county when found by Barry in June. See his equally stunning photo of blue fruiting bodies in Finds Jan-June dated June 19th.
Tricholomella constricta by Jesper Lauder July 5th Tricholomella constricta (an unusual Agaric with no common name) microscope

Whilst working on one of his raised beds at home in Jordans village Jesper Launder noticed this small white mushroom which, on excavation, revealed a distinct root. At one stage in the genus Calocybe, this species is difficult to place and has an odd set of features matching nothing else, hence now residing in its own genus. Though perhaps reminiscent of Tricholoma, it has a smooth and slightly viscid cap surface, is entirely white including gills and spores (which are ornamented with spines), and the stem has a narrow ring when young and is often rooting as here. It favours disturbed soil, also burnt or urinated spots and we have just three other known county sites for it.

July 3rd 2021

 Pluteus plautus by Jesper Lauder  Pluteus plautus by Jesper Lauder July 3rd Pluteus plautus (Satin Shield) microscope

On a wooden post supporting a raised bed in his garden in Jordans village Jesper Launder found this unusual species, one of the smaller Shields and with a somewhat pale cap compared to most, often with pinkish tones. The genus nearly always needs careful checking with a scope, an important feature being the cap cuticle (surface) which can be made up of long thin flat sausage-like cells (as in this species), much rounder upright cells, or some combination of different shapes. We have just a handful of previous sites in the county for this particular species.
Arcyria nutans (= obvelata)  by Jesper Lauder July 3rd Arcyria nutans (= obvelata) (A Slime Mould with no common name)

In Jordans village Jesper Launder spotted this cluster of tiny 'loofahs' on a damp wooden post in his garden. This species seems to be appearing in several places at the moment and is quite an easy one to recognise, the typical loofahs of the genus being in this case rather drooping and a distinctive pale buff colour. See also in Finds 2021 Jan to June dated June 23rd.

July 2nd 2021

 Lycoperdon pratense  by Jackie Ewan July 2nd Lycoperdon pratense (Meadow Puffball)

In the cherry orchard at Stampwell Farm Jackie Ewan found this common summer puffball, previously in the genus Vascellum and better known by that name. As its common name suggests, this is a species of short grassland and has rather a flat top rather than domed and also remains quite small compared to many others in the genus.

July 1st 2021

Clathrus archeri  by Jackie Ewan July 1st Clathrus archeri (Devil's Fingers)

At Stampwell Farm Jackie Ewan noticed that this strange and rare grassland species was already starting to fruit here. Last year she found it in good numbers here but a bit later in the year, so it would be interesting to know if it is also fruiting now at the other known site for it in Naphill near the Common where it turned up last year in October (see in Finds 2020 dated Oct 2nd). Related to the Stinkhorns, the species is a native of Australia but seems to be spreading here quite rapidly now.
Agaricus campestris  by Jesper Lauder July 1st Agaricus campestris (Field Mushroom)

In a meadow near Jordans village Jesper Launder found this young fresh mushroom just pushing through the grass and covered with early morning dew - an encouraging sign of the coming season approaching. He left it in situ rather than disturb its development so the crowded gills - no doubt still pink at this stage - and the white stem with a ring are features not yet visible here. Hopefully we'll have more images to elucidate the species further though this is a species much less frequently seen than it used to be.