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Slime Moulds by Barry Webb

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Entries with a green background indicate rare sightings

Entries with a yellow background indicate species new to Britain14

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Last updated September 8th 2021

A
 
Arcyria cinerea by Barry Webb Arcyria cinerea by Barry Webb Arcyria cinerea by Barry Webb Arcyria cinerea by Barry Webb Arcyria cinerea (a Slime Mould with no common name)

Barry found this quite common species in Burnham Beeches on fallen Birch (19.08.2020). Arcyria is an attractive and distinctive genus, producing sporangia shaped like tiny loofahs on stalks though their plasmodium - mostly patches of white sticky blobs like many slime mould genera - gives away nothing of its final shape once it matures. This particular species is unique within the genus being off white to pale grey when mature - hence its species name and making it an easy one to recognise in the field. Photo 2 is of a collection made at the same site the following year (10.06.2021). Photos 3 and 4 are of collections made at Bernwood Forest (29.08 2021) showing both immature and mature examples.
Arcyria denudata by Barry Webb Arcyria denudata (a Slime Mould with no common name)

This stunning photo was taken by Barry Webb of a collection on fallen Beech in Burnham Beeches. Like most Slime Moulds, this species starts out as a cluster of slimy white blobs (the plasmodium stage) when identification even to genus is not possible. As it matures it dries off and forms these remarkable miniature 'loofahs' on shiny red stalks, the whole being 6 mms high at most! There are quite a few species of Arcyria, some rare, some common as is this one, but none are quite so eye-catching. Note how the stalk develops into a cup which supports the spore mass column, seen here in various stages of maturity.
Arcyria obvelata by Barry Webb Arcyria obvelata (a Slime Mould with no common name)

Barry found this quite common species in Burnham Beeches on rotten Beech (01.08.2020), though we have only two previous county records. It is an easy one to recognise when mature being alone amongst species of Arcyria in having a somewhat drooping shape, a rather loose mesh and a very short stalk, the cream yellow colour is another distinctive feature though one or two other species can also be this colour (but not this shape).
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Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa  by Barry Webb Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa  by Barry Webb Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa (Coral Slime Mould)

Barry Webb took these beautiful photos of this tiny but quite common Slime Mould on a damp Pine stump in Burnham Beeches (31.05.2021). The individual delicate watery white branches are usually less than 5mm high and a handlens is needed to appreciate their beauty. It can form quite large dense clusters up to 10 cm across, most commonly on conifer stumps but sometimes on other woods. (See also Finds 2020 dated Oct 18th and Nov 6th).
Ceratiomyxa porioides by Barry Webb Ceratiomyxa porioides (a slime mould with no common name)

In Bernwood Forest (29.08.2020) on our first BFG walk of the year Gill Ferguson noticed some tiny white domes on rotten fallen Pine. Both she and Barry recognised it as this rare species, closely related to the common C. fruticulosa (see above) and until recently considered a variety of that species. Its delicate frilly poroid surface is remarkable. The species has only a few British records, one previously from Bucks, but apparently it is now spreading here and gradually becoming less rare.
Collaria (= Lamproderma) arcyrionema  by Barry Webb Collaria (= Lamproderma) arcyrionema  by Barry Webb Collaria (= Lamproderma) arcyrionema  by Barry Webb Collaria (= Lamproderma) arcyrionema) (a Slime Mould with no common name)

In Burnham Beeches (24.08.2020) Barry found this cluster of tiny shining iridescent specimens on fallen Pine. The species is apparently uncommon, and though more often found in the south of the UK this is our first county record. It is typified by its black stalk with a glittering silvery to bronze sporangia (head), under which is a tiny collar visible in Barry's beautiful photo 1. Photos 2 and 3 were of collections made the next year, also found on Pine at the same site, the silver sporangia on 06.07. 2021 and the more mature bronze sporangia on 12.07.2021.
Collaria (was Comatricha)  lurida  Barry Webb Collaria (was Comatricha)  lurida  by Barry Webb Collaria (= Comatricha) lurida (a slime mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found this very rare Myxomycete in Burnham Beeches on Holly and Beech leaves in a woodchip pile. The species is, however, extremely similar to the much less rare C. elegans, so Penny was a bit sceptical about this determination (made from Barry's excellent photos by a Myxomycete expert online) until Barry said he'd been asked to include a photo of a specimen with the spore mass blown away, revealing the distinctive shape of the columella within (like the skeleton) as well as the collar which forms beneath. The two species are easily separated by their individually shaped columellas, also C. lurida occurs on deciduous leaves, particularly Holly as here, whereas C. elegans occurs on conifer wood - not present in this woodchip pile. Case closed! Not only is this a notable find for the county but there are very few UK records of this species.
Scomatricha nigra by Barry Webb Comatricha nigra (a Slime Mould with no common name)

Barry found this one in Penn Wood on a rotting Pine branch (10.10.2020) and though he says he finds it commonly locally this is only our third county record. (The determination was confirmed online by Myxo expert Edvin Johannesen.) This beautiful little species occurs on bark on many trees, especially conifer. It is characterised by its long hairlike black stalk and tiny globose pinkish top section, the whole less than 1 cm tall and occurring in colonies, often forming lines.
Comatricha pulchella or anomala, possibly by Barry Webb Comatricha pulchella or anomala? (a Slime Mould with no common name)

A beautiful photo, by Barry Webb, of a species which, however, needs confirmation using a microscope which was unfortunately not able to be carried out here.
Craterium minutum  by Barry Webb Craterium minutum  by Barry Webb Craterium minutum (a slime mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found these tiny little beauties in Burnham Beeches on leaves of Holly and Beech in a woodchip pile (14.03.2021). (The determination was confirmed online by Myxo expert Valerie Bruneau Querey.) These miniscule little wine goblets are only about 1 mm high, each initially covered by a flat lid which in the RH sporangium in photo 2 can be seen just lifting off to reveal the spore mass beneath. This is a distinctive species, its shape together with the ochre colour and lid making it recognisable in the field. We have just two previous county records though this appears to be a first for Burnham Beeches.
Cribraria argillacea by Barry Webb Cribraria argillacea by Barry Webb Cribraria argillacea by Barry Webb Cribraria argillacea by Barry Webb Cribraria argillacea by Barry Webb Cribraria argillacea by Barry Webb Cribraria argillacea by Barry Webb Cribraria argillacea by Barry Webb Cribraria argillacea (a slime mould with no common name)

In Burnham Beeches (07.09.2020) Barry found this cluster (photo 1) just developing from its plasmodium on rotting Birch and typically slate blue and shiny. Photos 2 and 3 are slightly further developed with a more complete network visible on the sporangia; photo 4 shows the mature ochraceous to clay sporangia, hence the species name meaning clay coloured. The species is characterised by having very short stalks and forming large closely packed colonies. We have just three previous records in the county but this was a first for the Beeches, with subsequent collections from the same site dated 02.08.2021 for photos 2 and 3 on rotting Pine, 09.06.2021 for photo 4 on rotting Birch. Photos 5-8 were all taken at the same time from a colony found at Stoke Common (18.09.2021) where also new to the site. and again showing the development from plasmodium (typically slate blue grey) to almost mature.
Cribraria aurantiiaca by Barry Webb Cribraria aurantiaca  by Barry Webb Cribraria aurantiaca  by Barry Webb Cribraria aurantiaca  by Barry Webb Cribraria aurantiaca (a Slime Mould with no common name)

In Burnham Beeches (28.08.2020) on fallen rotting Birch Barry found these exquisite little specimens of what is described as a common species though we appear to have no previous county records. The markedly tapering bright reddish brown stalk is typical, also the bright green plasmodium which can persist at the base. The round sporangia develop through green to blue then eventually ochre orange when mature, retaining this amazing meshlike network which characterises the genus (like a crib or cradle?). The whole is only 2 mm tall. Subsequent photos are of collections made the following year at the same site, the stunning blue specimens found on 19.06.2021, the green specimens on 22.07.2021, and more mature material on 02.08.2021 on rotting Pine.
Cribraria cancellata  by Barry Webb Cribraria cancellata  by Barry Webb Cribraria cancellata  by Barry Webb Cribraria cancellata (a Slime Mould with no common name)

In Burnham Beeches (06.07.2021) on rotting fallen Pine Barry found this tiny but beautiful species which was new to the site and with just one previous county record - notably found by the distinguished Myxomycete specialist Bruce Ing from Salcey Forest, 1991. All species in the genus have this amazing meshlike network surrounding the head, particularly marked in this species which, however, lacks a 'cup' at the base of the mesh though present in most species. It has purple black plasmodium and a long dark tapering stalk when developed as seen in photo 1. Photos 2 and 3 were found at Stoke Common (18.09.2021), also new to the site there.
Cribraria cancellata var. fusca  by Barry Webb Cribraria cancellata var. fusca  by Barry Webb Cribraria cancellata var. fusca  by Barry Webb Cribraria cancellata var. fusca  by Barry Webb Cribraria cancellata var. fusca (a Slime Mould with no common name)

In Penn Wood (13.08.2021) on fallen Pine Barry found this rare species, new to the county and with not many British records though the type species (see just above) is apparently more common. Photo 3 is of a further collection from Burnham Beeches found three days later by Barry, also on Pine. This variety differs from the type by having a well marked cup at the base of the sporangia (lacking in the type). Both species have many longditudinal ribs around the sporangia linked by ladder-like threads, seen in the detailed photo 4. Bear in mind that each individual fruiting body is no more than 3mm high and the heads no more than 0.7mm in diameter!
Cribraria mirabilis  by Barry Webb Cribraria mirabilis  by Barry Webb Cribraria mirabilis  by Barry Webb Cribraria mirabilis (a slime mould with no common name)

On rotten fallen Pine in Burnham Beeches (16.08.2021) Barry found this beautiful and rare species, one with under 10 national records and new to the county. (The identification was verified online from these photos by Norwegian expert Edvin Johanssen.) Only up to 1.5 mm tall and 0.8mm wide, it is similar to C. cancellata in lacking a cup and having a cage of longditudinal ribs but is irridescent in early stages. The three photos show it immature, maturing and finally mature. (There seems to be some confusion over previous records, Edvin informing Barry that the last record was UK expert Bruce Ing's from Bucks in 1968. However, our national database shows that record was from Scotland with others after it, none from Bucks.)
Cribraria persoonia  by Barry Webb Cribraria persoonia  by Barry Webb Cribraria persoonia Cribraria persoonia

In Burnham Beeches (18.08.2021) on fallen Pine Barry found this species, new to the county and with not many British records despite being described as common in the literature. The initial determination, made online from the photos, is now verified by Penny having examined the material. This is another tiny and delicate species no more than 1.5 mm high with a tapering brown stalk and having a wrinkled cup at the base of the sporangia which is about a third of the whole.
Cribaria rufa  by Barry Webb Cribraria rufa by Barry Webb Cribraria rufa by Barry Webb Cribraria rufa by Barry Webb Cribraria rufa by Barry Webb Cribraria rufa by Barry Webb Cribraria rufa (a slime mould with no common name)

In Penn Wood (20.09.2020) Barry Webb found this tiny little specimen (Photo 1) on fallen rotten Pine, the spore mass having blown away to reveal the perfect and delicate framework. About 20 species of this beautiful genus occur in the UK, mostly found on rotting conifer wood, and this one has apparently become much more common with the increase in plantations. However, we have no previous records in the county. Photo 2 is of a slightly less developed cluster found at the time. The following year Barry found further examples in Burnham Beeches on Pine where it was new to the site: Photo 3 and 4 on 10.07.2021, photo 5 on 02.08.2021. Photo 6 is of a collection from Ivinghoe Common, also on Pine, on 13.09.2021.
Cribraria vulgaris  by Barry Webb Cribraria vulgaris  by Barry Webb Cribraria vulgaris  by Barry Webb Cribraria vulgaris (a slime mould with no common name)

In Burnham Beeches (06.06.2021) on fallen damp Pine Barry found these minute (even for a slime mould) specimens which were only 0.5 mm across! (The determination was confirmed online by Norwegian expert Edvin Johannesen.) A rare species with few national records, this was an exciting find. The single record for the county dates back to 1923 (at Burnham Beeches) with both collector and identifier as 'Anon', so probably best overlooked, making Barry's find new to Bucks. Photos 2 and 3 are of collections both verified by Penny, the first from Bernwood Forest (29.08.2021) and the second from Ivinghoe Common a week later (04.09.2021).
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Dictydiaethalium plumbeum  by Barry Webb Dictydiaethalium plumbeum (a Slime Mould with no common name)

In Burnham Beeches (23.06.2021) on rotting fallen Beech Barry found this unusual slime mould, one which is new to the site and with just two previous county records. It is a species with bright pink to orange plasmodium (seen here) which turns first grey (hence its Latin species name) then yellow-brown and forms flattened patches on rotting deciduous wood up to 5 cm long x 1 cm thick. It would be possible to mistake the plasmodium of this species with that of the common Tubifera ferruginosa (also bright pink orange) if one was not aware of the identity of the host wood. D. plumbeum occurs on rotting deciduous wood, especially Beech as here; T. ferruginosa occurs on rotting conifer (very occasionally on Alder or Birch).
Diderma floriforme  by Barry Webb Diderma floriforme  by Barry Webb Diderma floriforme (a slime mould with no common name)

In Ivinghoe Common on our BFG walk (04.09.2021) member Stephen Plummer spotted a cluster of these tiny little beauties on a very rotten log, probably Beech - a species new to Barry with just two previous county records. The distinctive pearl grey round heads are coated with a two-tone double layer of calcareous crust (clearly visible here) which breaks open to reveal the contrasting dark ripening spore mass within.
Didymium clavus by Barry Webb Didymium clavus (a slime mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found this tiny specimen in deciduous leaf litter in Burnham Beeches (30.12.2020) - a new record for the site and also for the county. (The determination was confirmed online by Myxo expert Edvin Johannesen.) Didymium is a large and tricky genus, many species of which look extremely similar. They are characterised by having a covering of calcium carbonate crystals, either as an egg-shell crust or a dusting as here, either with or without a stalk - the relative length of which, if present, is significant together with its shape and colour.The top spore-bearing part can be globose or discoid (more flattened) as here. Despite our lack of records, this is described as a common species on deciduous leaf litter.
Didymium nigripes by Barry Webb Didymium nigripes (a slime mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found this tiny slime mould in deciduous leaf litter in Burnham Beeches (18.09.2020) where it was new for the site though we have only one previous county record. (The determination was confirmed online by Myxo expert Fred Spiegel.) It is described as quite common across the country though most records seem to be from the south. See notes for D. clavus for general comments on the genus. The relatively long dark narrowing stalk and globose spore-bearing head are characteristic of this particular species.
Didymium squamulosum  by Barry Webb Didymium squamulosum  by Barry Webb Didymium squamulosum (a slime mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found this beautiful slime mould in deciduous leaf litter in Burnham Beeches (28.12.2020). (The determination was confirmed online by Myxo expert Paco Moreno) This is one of the commonest species of Didymium and we have plenty of county records though apparently only one previously for this site back in 1923! See notes for D. clavus for general comments on the genus. The short white stalk and subglobose spore-bearing head are characteristic of this particular species. Photo 2 is of a second collection from Burnham Beeches (09.05.2021) found by Barry on a woodchip pile.
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Enerthenema papillatum   by Barry Webb Enerthenema papillatum by Barry Webb Enerthenema papillatum (a slime mould with no common name)

In Penn Wood Barry Webb found these tiny specimens growing on rotting fallen Beech (22.08.2020). This is the only species of the genus found in the UK and though apparently common we have just three previous records from the north of the county, the most recent of which was in 2001. The distinctive flattened top with shiny central disc and black stalk narrowing at the top make this species recognisable in the field. The central disc can be seen already forming in the immature specimens in photo 2.
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Hemitrichia calyculata  by Barry Webb Hemitrichia calyculata. by Barry Webb Hemitrichia calyculata (a slime mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found this beautiful slime mould on fallen rotting Birch in Common Wood (01.03.2021). Though described as a common species in the south, this appears to be our first county record - reflecting the general lack of local expertise and interest in slime moulds until Barry put this right and started producing his amazing photos.There are several very similar species, so Penny would have been happier to have checked the microscopic characters as it's a first for the county, but the dark solid stalk suddenly flaring out at the top together with the tear-drop shaped sporangium (spore bearing mass) having a shallow shiny cup with typically frayed edges is sufficiently diagnostic to confirm Barry's determination.
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Lamproderma scintillans  by Barry Webb Lamproderma scintillans (a slime mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found these glistening little beauties (only 1-2 mm high) in Burnham Beeches (24.12.2020) in deciduous leaf litter. This species is not only new to the site but also to the county. (The determination was confirmed by Andy Sands from Barry's excellent photo.) The iridescent colours are typical of the genus, all species of which are very small thus often missed and presumably under-recorded also.
Lycogala conicum  by Barry Webb Lycogala conicum  by Barry Webb Lycogala conicum (a Slime Mould with no common name)

In Burnham Beeches (06.07.2021) on rotting fallen Birch Barry found this rare species, similar to the very common and familiar L. terrestre (Wolf's Milk) but instantly separable from it by its very distinctive conical egg shape. As with the (much) commoner species the plasmodium stage is pink, as are the developing sporocarps (fruiting bodies) which as they mature and dry off become gradually grey buff. Photo 2 (taken of a collection on a different Birch nearby found 10 days later) shows mature sporocarps. New to the site and the county, there appear to be under 20 national records of this species.
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Metatrichia floriformis  by Barry Webb Metatrichia floriformis by Barry Webb Metatrichia floriformis by Barry Webb Metatrichia floriformis by Barry Webb Metatrichia floriformis (a Slime Mould with no common name)

Barry Webb took the first photo in Penn Wood (17.10.2020), part of a colony of this tiny very common slime mould which grows on rotting damp fallen wood. The plasmodium (early slimy stage) of this particular species is dark red to black, then it gradually 'mutates', developing into these black blobs on stalks less than 4 mm high which then split open forming a flower-like shape (hence its species name) and from which the orange spore mass disperses. Photo 2, found in 2019 at the same spot in Penn Wood, shows this later stage. Photos 3 and 4, also showing two stages of development, were found at Ivinghoe Common (04.09.2021).
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Physarum album  by Barry Webb Physarum album  by Barry Webb Physarum album (a Slime Mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found this quite common species (previously known as Physarum nutans) growing in Beech litter at Burnham Beeches (01.11.2020). A member of a large and difficult genus to identify to species, this particular species can with experience be named in the field because of its 'nodding' habit: the heads, covered in white crystals, tend to droop. Found sometimes in large colonies, each sporocarp (fruiting body) is no taller than 1 cm. Photo 2 is of a collection made at Ivinghoe Common (04.09.2021).
Physarum compressum  by Barry Webb Physarum compressum  by Barry Webb Physarum compressum (a slime mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found this delightful line of tiny blobs in Burnham Beeches (16.03.2021) on a woodchip pile. (The determination was confirmed online by Myxo expert Edvin Johannesen.) This particular species has a very dumpy short stalk (not called a stem or stipe as in fungi) and over all is no more than 1 mm tall. Though described as quite common, this is our first record for the county.
Physarum leucophaeum  by Barry Webb Physarum leucophaeum (a Slime Mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found these tiny gems on rotting fallen Beech in Burnham Beeches (16.10.2020). No more than 1.5 mm high, this species is a member of a very large genus which has a protective coating of calcareous crystals or granules covering the sporangium (fruiting head), giving the appearance of being dusted with icing sugar. We have just two county records of this species, reflecting the rarity of expertise amongst recorders rather than of what is apparently a common species! (See also P. leucopus found the same day.)
Physarum leucopus  by Barry Webb Physarum leucopus (a Slime Mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found this uncommon slime mould growing in moss on a Beech log in Burnham Beeches 06.11.2020). (The determination was confirmed online by Myxo expert Edvin Johannesen.) Clearly very similar to P. leucophaeum, (see notes for that species), it inhabits woodland debris rather than wood itself and has a distinctive white stalk, hence its species name. This is new not only to the site but also to the county.
Physarum pusillum by Barry Webb Physarum pusillum by Barry Webb Physarum pusillum (a slime mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found this inconspicuous species in Burnham Beeches (29.03.2021) on a woodchip pile. (The determination was confirmed online by Myxo expert Edvin Johannesen.) This particular species is distinguished by its relatively tall and slender reddish brown stalk, the whole sporangia being only up to 2mm tall. Though described as quite common, this is yet another first record for the county.
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Stemonitis axifera  by Barry Webb Stemonitis axifera (a species of 'Pipe-cleaner' Slime Mould with no common name) (Common) microscope

In Burnham Beeches (28.07.2021) on damp rotting deciduous wood Barry found this small cluster of tiny 'pipe-cleaners', the sporangia being mature enough for Penny to be able to identify it at home. The tiny smooth spores were diagnostic and though the species is not considered rare, this was new to the site and we appear to have only one previous county record.
Stemonitis flavogenita  by Barry Webb Stemonitis flavogenita  by Barry Webb Stemonitis flavogenita  by Barry Webb Stemonitis flavogenita  by Barry Webb Stemonitis flavogenita  by Barry Webb Stemonitis flavogenita (a species of 'Pipe-cleaner' Slime Mould with no common name) microscope

Barry Webb found a rotting fallen Birch trunk in Burnham Beeches (06.09.2021) with this Stemonitis species (at this stage unidentified) just starting to develop from the plasmodium (slimy) stage when the transformation in colour, shape and texture can be quite dramatic. He took this amazing set of photos over the space of several hours apart from the final one - taken when a group of us visited the site 4 days later when Penny took a now fully mature specimen to identify to species with a scope (only possible at this stage). S. flavogenita is alone in the genus in having bright yellow plasmodium rather than the normal white (as its Latin species name implies), but if not seen at this initial stage (just a slimy fragile shapeless mound) this useful clue is missed as all species tend to go through the same colour changes once the stalks and pipe-cleaner shape have formed: first yellowish then gradually pinkish and eventually some shade of cocoa brown - all in a matter of a few hours once it starts - before drying off completely as in the final photo here. The species is not rare but also not the commonest of the genus which is S. fusca - seen below.
Stemonitis fusca  by Barry Webb Stemonitis fusca (a species of 'Pipe-cleaner' Slime Mould with no common name) microscope

On a rotting bare Birch trunk in Burnham Beeches (09.06.2021) Gill Ferguson found these little clusters of chocolate pipe-cleaners. Although nearby was a trunk with Stemonitis flavogenita (seen above), it could not be assumed that this collection was the same species, so Penny collected samples of both to examine at home. This second collection turned out to be this the commonest species within the genus, characterised not just by microscopic differences but also by having a notably shiny black stalk forming up to half the total height (in S. flavogenita the stalk is less shiny and shorter). (photo by Barry Webb).
Stemonitis sp by Barry Webb Stemonitis sp (an unidentified species of the Slime Mould genus Stemonitis)

Growing on fallen Beech in Burnham Beeches (28.09.2020) Barry found this typical example of a very distinctive genus of Slime Moulds. At this early stage before it has dried off and developed the brown spore mass above the stalk it is not possible to name to species but the genus is easily recognised once it forms this tight 'forest' of pipe-cleaner-like tufts.
Stemonitopsis hyperopta or amoena, possibly by Barry Webb Stemonitopsis sp (hyperopta / amoena or maybe even Comatricha pulchella!)

Barry found this little collection on Apple at Hedgerley Green (15.09.2020) but all were too young to be identified. The white specimens on the left are just developing from the (presumably white) plasmodium stage. As they mature they gradually darken, becoming at first pink then later reddish brown before drying off as the spores ripen. Only at this later stage can they be examined to identify.
Stemonitopsis typhina by Barry Webb Stemonitopsis typhina (a Slime Mould with no common name)

Barry Webb took this beautiful photo of a very common slime mould found on a damp Beech branch in Burnham Beeches (19.10.2020). Each sporocarp (fruiting body) is no more than 5 mm high and its shape resembles the similar genus Stemonitis but the species is characterised by these persistently silvery shining cylindrical heads and beneath them a stalk reminiscent of old fashioned silk stockings, the central black core looking like the seam!
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Trichia botrytis  by Barry Webb Trichia botrytis (a slime mould with no common name)

In Penn Wood (21.11.2020) Barry Webb found this cluster of tiny specimens fruiting on fallen Oak. There are many species of Trichia and a scope is nearly always needed to name them but the very distinctive mottled markings seen here are enough to separate it from others in the field.
Trichia decipiens by Barry Webb Trichia decipiens by Barry Webb Trichia decipiens (a Slime Mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found these tiny orange blobs on stalks on rotting fallen Beech in Burnham Beeches. Most Slime Moulds have white plasmodium at this immature stage when identification even to genus is not possible, but a few species have brightly coloured plasmodium and can be named, this being one of them. There are many species of the genus Trichia but only this species has white stalks with orange to pink blobs on top when immature. Photo 2 shows a more mature example (this one from Penn Wood - 01.11.2020), when the blobs are drying off but are still not mature enough to have developed spores.
Trichia varia  by Barry Webb Trichia varia (a Slime Mould with no common name) microscope

In Burnham Beeches (28.07.2021) on damp rotting deciduous wood Barry found this colony of one of the commonest species of Trichia which was mature enough for Penny to be able to identify it at home. This is a genus with many somewhat similar species, most of which start out as a small patch of white blobby plasmodium which gradually turns yellow then dries off to form tight clusters of sporangia, some species having a short stalk (see images of T. decipiens above), some without as here.
Tubifera ferruginosa  by Barry Webb Tubifera ferruginosa  by Barry Webb Tubifera ferruginosa  by Barry Webb Tubifera ferruginosa (a Slime Mould with no common name)

Barry found this very common species in Burnham Beeches on fallen Birch (07.09.2020) though it most commonly occurs on fallen Pine. It has possibly the brightest plasmodium of all slime moulds: coloured brilliant orange, apricot or pink and leaving little doubt as to species especially when found on Pine where no other slime mould is this colour. Photo 2 shows a patch rapidly maturing when it becomes dull brown and inconspicuous. Photo 3 is of a collection found at Ivinghoe Common, (13.09.2021) just beginning to form the tightly clustered columns which then turn brown.

More of Barry's photos (not slime moulds but tiny fungi) follow below:

Philobolus crystallinus by Barry Webb Pilobolus crystallinus (Dung Cannon - a Phycomycete i.e. a form of Ascomycete)

Barry Webb took this remarkable photo of an amazing fungus found on pony dung in Burnham Beeches (17.07.2020). Each fruiting body is less than 1 cm tall and the fungus has the unique ability to literally fire its mature spores up to 2 meters away where their sticky coating adheres them to the vegetation which is then consumed by grazing animals, passes through the gut to develop on their dung where the whole cycle is repeated. The fungus can be found on the dung of various animals including deer, rabbit, squirrel as well as horse as here.
Scutellinia scutellata  by Barry Webb Scutellinia scutellata  by Barry Webb Scutellinia scutellata (Eyelash Fungus) with Metatrichia floriformis (a slime mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found these two species growing together on rotting bare wood in Burnham Beeches (10.01.2020). Though not checked with a scope, the Eyelash Fungus is likely to be this particular species which has by far the longest 'eyelashes' surrounding its cup in the genus. The tiny stalked black slime mould specimens are at the stage just prior to splitting open to reveal the spore mass within. Photo 2 demonstrates the difference in size between the species - the Scutellinia being no more than 1.5 cms across.