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Slime Moulds by Barry Webb

Trichia botrytis  by Barry Webb November 21st Trichia botrytis (a slime mould with no common name)

In Penn Wood Barry Webb found this cluster of tiny specimens fruiting on fallen Oak. There are many species of Trichia and a scope is nearly always needed to name them but the very distinctive mottled markings seen here are enough to separate it from others.
Enerthenema papillatum   by Barry Webb Enerthenema papillatum (a slime mould with no common name)

In Penn Wood Barry Webb found these tiny specimens growing on rotting fallen Beech. This is the only species of the genus found in the UK and we have just three previous records from the north of the county, the most recent of which was in 2001.
Cribaria rufa  by Barry Webb Cribaria rufa (a slime mould with no common name)

In Penn Wood Barry Webb found this tiny little specimen fruiting on fallen rotten Pine. About 20 species of this beautiful genus occur in the UK, mostly found on rotting conifer wood, and this one has apparently become much more common with the increase in plantations. However, we have no previous records in the county.
Didymium nigripes by Barry Webb Didymium nigripes (a slime mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found this tiny slime mould in deciduous leaf litter in Burnham Beeches where it is new for the site though we have only one previous county record. It is described as quite common across the country though most records seem to be from the south. Didymium is a large genus, many species of which look extremely similar, but the dark stalk base is apparently diagnostic here.
Didymium clavus by Barry Webb Didymium clavus (a slime mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found this tiny specimen in deciduous leaf litter in Burnham Beeches. It is new to the site and also to the county, and the determination was confirmed by Edvin Johannesen from Barry's photo. Compare with photos of other Didymium species on finds 2020 to see the typical features of the genus.
Didymium squamulosum  by Barry Webb Didymium squamulosum (a slime mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found this beautiful slime mould in deciduous leaf litter in Burnham Beeches. This is one of the commonest species of Didymium and we have plenty of county records though apparently only one previously for this site back in 1923! Compare with photos of other Didymium species on finds 2020 to see the typical features of the genus.
Lamproderma scintillans  by Barry Webb Lamproderma scintillans (a slime mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found these glistening little beauties (only 1-2 mm high) in Burnham Beeches in deciduous leaf litter. This species is not only new to the site but also to the county and the determination was confirmed by Andy Sands from Barry's excellent photo. The iridescent colours are typical of the genus, all species of which are very small thus often missed and presumably under-recorded also.
Physarum album  by Barry Webb Physarum album (a Slime Mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found this quite common species (previously known as Physarum nutans?) in Burnham Beeches growing in Beech litter. A member of a large and difficult genus to identify to species, this particular species can with experience be named in the field because of its 'nodding' habit: the heads, covered in white crystals, tend to droop. Found sometimes in large colonies, each sporocarp (fruiting body) is no taller than 1 cm.
Cribraria rufa by Barry Webb Cribraria rufa (a Slime Mould with no common name)


Philobolus crystallinus by Barry Webb Philobolus crystallinus (a Slime Mould with no common name)


Arcyria obvelata by Barry Webb Arcyria obvelata (a Slime Mould with no common name)


Arcyria cinerea by Barry Webb Arcyria cinerea (a Slime Mould with no common name)


Stemonitopsis typhina by Barry Webb Stemonitopsis typhina (a Slime Mould with no common name)

Barry Webb took this beautiful photo of a very common slime mould found on a damp Beech branch in Burnham Beeches. Each sporocarp (fruiting body) is no more than 5 mm high and its shape resembles the similar genus Stemonitis but the species is characterised by these persistently silvery shining cylindrical heads and beneath them a stalk which reminds of silk stockings, the central black core looking like the seam!
Physarum leucopus  by Barry Webb Physarum leucopus (a Slime Mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found this uncommon slime mould growing in moss on a Beech log in Burnham Beeches. Clearly very similar to P. leucophaeum, also found today (see notes for that species), it inhabits woodland debris rather than wood itself and has a distinctive white stalk, hence its species name. This is new not only to the site but also to the county.
Physarum leucophaeum  by Barry Webb Physarum leucophaeum (a Slime Mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found these tiny gems on rotting fallen Beech in Burnham Beeches. No more than 1.5 mm high, this species is a member of a very large genus which has a protective coating of calcareous crystals or granules covering the sporangium (fruiting head), giving the appearance of being dusted with icing sugar! We have just two county records of this species, reflecting the rarity of expertise amongst recorders rather than of what is apparently a common species! (See also P. leucopus found the same day.)
Metatrichia floriformis  by Barry Webb Metatrichia floriformis (a Slime Mould with no common name)

Barry Webb took the first photo in Penn Wood, part of a colony of this tiny very common slime mould which grows on rotting damp fallen wood. The plasmodium (early slimy stage) of this particular species is dark red to black, then it gradually 'mutates', developing into these black blobs on stalks less than 4 mm high which then split open forming a flower-like shape (hence its species name) and from which the spore mass disperses. The second photo, taken in 2019 at the same site in Penn Wood, shows this later stage.
Arcyria denudata by Barry Webb Arcyria denudata (a Slime Mould with no common name)

This stunning photo was taken by Barry Webb of a collection on fallen Beech in Burnham Beeches. Like most Slime Moulds, this species starts out as a cluster of slimy white blobs (the plasmodium stage) when identification even to genus is not possible. As it matures it dries off and forms these remarkable miniature 'loofahs' on shiny red stalks, the whole being 6 mms high at most! There are quite a few species of Arcyria, some rare, some common as is this one, but none are quite so eye-catching. Note how the stalk develops into a cup which supports the spore mass column, seen here in various stages of maturity.
Trichia decipiens by Barry Webb Trichia decipiens (a Slime Mould with no common name)

Barry Webb found these tiny orange blobs on stalks on rotting fallen Beech in Burnham Beeches. Most Slime Moulds have white plasmodium at this immature stage when identification even to genus is not possible, but a few species have brightly coloured plasmodium and can be named. There are many species of the genus Trichia but only this particular species has white stalks with orange to pink blobs on top. We'll try and add photos of its mature stage if / when available.
Lamproderma sp. by Barry Webb Lamproderma sp. by Barry Webb


Cribraria aurantiiaca by Barry Webb Cribraria aurantiiaca by Barry Webb


Cribraria sp by Barry Webb Cribraria sp by Barry Webb


Enerthenema papillatum by Barry Webb Enerthenema papillatum by Barry Webb


Hemitrichia calyculata. by Barry Webb Hemitrichia calyculata. by Barry Webb


Metatrichia floriformis by Barry Webb Metatrichia floriformis by Barry Webb


Stemonitis sp by Barry Webb Stemonitis sp by Barry Webb


Stemonitopsis hyperopta or amoena, possibly by Barry Webb Stemonitopsis hyperopta or amoena, possibly by Barry Webb


Scomatricha nigra by Barry Webb Comatricha nigra by Barry Webb


Comatricha pulchella or anomala, possibly by Barry Webb Comatricha pulchella or anomala, possibly by Barry Webb